Museu(M)use

Ramblings on museums, education, history, politics, current events, with a dash of kittens and real life

"...but then history does not only consist of documents."

- John Lukacs

todaysdocument:


San Francisco, California. The family unit in kept intact in various phases of evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry. …A view at Wartime Civil Control Administration station, 2020 Van Ness Avenue, on April 6, 1942, when first group of 664 was evacuated from San Francisco. The family unit likewise is preserved in War Relocation Authority centers where evacuees will spend the duration.

This photo of Japanese-American evacuees was taken by Dorothea Lange on April 6, 1942.   Professional photographers such as Lange were commissioned by the WRA to document the daily life and treatment of Japanese-Americans during World War II.

todaysdocument:

San Francisco, California. The family unit in kept intact in various phases of evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry. …A view at Wartime Civil Control Administration station, 2020 Van Ness Avenue, on April 6, 1942, when first group of 664 was evacuated from San Francisco. The family unit likewise is preserved in War Relocation Authority centers where evacuees will spend the duration.

This photo of Japanese-American evacuees was taken by Dorothea Lange on April 6, 1942.   Professional photographers such as Lange were commissioned by the WRA to document the daily life and treatment of Japanese-Americans during World War II.

Posted April 7th, 2012 with 89 notes .

congressarchives:

Today the National Archives launched the 1940 Census online. This is the first time the census has ever been available online in its entirety!
The first census was taken in 1790, and has continued to be conducted every 10 years. Until 1840, Federal judges and marshals throughout the U.S. administered the census. In 1840, Congress passed the Census Act which created a central office for the census that opened and closed for each counting. Finally in 1902, Congress passed this act creating a permanent Census Office within the Federal government.
H.R. 198, a bill to establish a permanent Census Bureau, 12/2/1901, HR57A-B1, Records of the U.S. House of Representatives

Today’s the day!!

congressarchives:

Today the National Archives launched the 1940 Census online. This is the first time the census has ever been available online in its entirety!

The first census was taken in 1790, and has continued to be conducted every 10 years. Until 1840, Federal judges and marshals throughout the U.S. administered the census. In 1840, Congress passed the Census Act which created a central office for the census that opened and closed for each counting. Finally in 1902, Congress passed this act creating a permanent Census Office within the Federal government.

H.R. 198, a bill to establish a permanent Census Bureau, 12/2/1901, HR57A-B1, Records of the U.S. House of Representatives

Today’s the day!!

(via todaysdocument)

Posted April 2nd, 2012 with 40 notes .

katemacetak:

libraryjournal:

laphamsquarterly:


“I am very cold”
“The parchment is very hairy.”
“Oh, my hand.”

—Notes from medieval monks and scribes in the margins of their work
Our latest issue “Means of Communication” is now online. Take a break from the scriptorium to check it out! 

“St. Patrick of Armagh, deliver me from writing.”

I’m going to start saying that when I’m writing papers now.

katemacetak:

libraryjournal:

laphamsquarterly:

“I am very cold”

“The parchment is very hairy.”

“Oh, my hand.”

—Notes from medieval monks and scribes in the margins of their work

Our latest issue “Means of Communication” is now online. Take a break from the scriptorium to check it out! 

“St. Patrick of Armagh, deliver me from writing.”

I’m going to start saying that when I’m writing papers now.

(via lostinhistory)

Posted March 25th, 2012 with 5,707 notes .

todaysdocument:

The Act creating Yellowstone National Park, 140 years ago today, from our colleagues at the Center for Legislative Archives:

congressarchives:

On March 1, 1872, President Ulysses S. Grant signed H.R. 16 into law, creating Yellowstone National Park. Yellowstone was our young nation’s first national park. In 1888 there was a nationwide movement to further preserve Yellowstone. The Center for Legislative Archives has numerous petitions, like the one shown above, from citizens across the U.S. asking Congress to protect the park against trespassers and developers, as well as to preserve the wildlife and other natural wonders that exist within the park. In 1916, Congress created, with the approval of President Woodrow Wilson, the National Park Service within the Department of the Interior to oversee the preservation of national parks and monuments “for the enjoyment of future generations.”

An Act to Create Yellowstone National Park,3/1/1872, General Records of the U.S. Government (ARC 596351)

Petition from citizens praying for the protection of Yellowstone National Park, 3/1888, Records of the U.S. House of Representatives

Posted March 1st, 2012 with 82 notes.

lewisiarediviva:

todaysdocument:

President Thomas Jefferson’s message to Congress communicating the discoveries of the explorers Lewis and Clark, 02/19/1806 

Three years earlier President Jefferson had approached Congress via secret message to request funding for the expedition.

What a coincidence! I am reading about this right now!

(via thefairestportion-deactivated20)

Posted February 19th, 2012 with 80 notes.

todaysdocument:

Dated January 14, 1864, this letter written by 1st Sergeant Stephen A. Swails of the 54th Regiment of Massachusetts Infantry claims the Army had not honored its obligations regarding his pay. While white first sergeants were receiving $20 per month, Swails was receiving only $7. In this letter, he demanded equal pay for colored troops or requested to be mustered out of the service.

Posted January 16th, 2012 with 110 notes.

archaeology:

The Fire at the L’Institut d’Egypte a “great loss”

On Sunday the Institute D’Egypte caught fire and burned. The Institute  was established in 1798 by the French, and held an estimated 200,000  volumes, including rare accounts of Egypt in the 18th Century. I must  confess I had no knowledge of the Institute before yesterday, but  because I, like many privileged folks in the developed world, have  access to Wikipedia, I know it is an important building, and an  important repository of information. Yet most Egyptians don’t have that  luxury. As Larry Rothfield points out, neither the protesters, nor the  military seemed to know this was an important building containing books and manuscripts.

archaeology:

The Fire at the L’Institut d’Egypte a “great loss”

On Sunday the Institute D’Egypte caught fire and burned. The Institute was established in 1798 by the French, and held an estimated 200,000 volumes, including rare accounts of Egypt in the 18th Century. I must confess I had no knowledge of the Institute before yesterday, but because I, like many privileged folks in the developed world, have access to Wikipedia, I know it is an important building, and an important repository of information. Yet most Egyptians don’t have that luxury. As Larry Rothfield points out, neither the protesters, nor the military seemed to know this was an important building containing books and manuscripts.

Posted December 21st, 2011 with 98 notes .

todaysdocument:

On December 8, 1941, the day after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt delivered this “Day of Infamy Speech,” shown here as the first draft. Immediately afterward, Congress declared war, and the United States entered World War II.

via Prologue: “FDR’s ‘Day of Infamy’ Speech: Crafting a Call to Arms”

(via npr)

Posted December 8th, 2011 with 328 notes.

shuraiya:

themuseologist:

fyeahhistorymajorheraldicbeast:

(by the-village-green)

 True story: At my archives room, we’re allowed to basically handle everything with our hands. I was a little surprised, given the nature of some of the documents - Civil war letters are to be handled with extreme care if they get taken out of their sheaths for scanning - but it’s pretty cool. I guess one of the French professors likes to brag that you can’t handle original Diderot Encyclopedias in Paris, but you can here. I don’t know if that’s true or not, but since patrons and guests have to be monitored for help, I had a great time showing some prospectives’ parents the set.
They were staring pretty intensely and curiously at the Diderot’s and I said: “Those are original French Diderot Encyclopedias from the 1700s. Would you like to see them?”
And the mom just looked rather startled and pleased - “Can we? I mean, I’d hate to break it!”
These things are pretty big and heavy, and while you could ruin them in several ways, I took a random one off the shelf and let her view some pages while I explained what they were and why they’re so cool. (You can learn about that all here, if you’re curious about the Encyclopédie, ou dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers!)
The mom was way more excited than the daughter was, but still! It was fun to show it.

That’s such a cool story!

As it was explained to me, the oils from our hands help keep the documents supple. I got to leaf through a 12th Century Book of Hours that had me swooning.

shuraiya:

themuseologist:

fyeahhistorymajorheraldicbeast:

(by the-village-green)

 True story: At my archives room, we’re allowed to basically handle everything with our hands. I was a little surprised, given the nature of some of the documents - Civil war letters are to be handled with extreme care if they get taken out of their sheaths for scanning - but it’s pretty cool. I guess one of the French professors likes to brag that you can’t handle original Diderot Encyclopedias in Paris, but you can here. I don’t know if that’s true or not, but since patrons and guests have to be monitored for help, I had a great time showing some prospectives’ parents the set.

They were staring pretty intensely and curiously at the Diderot’s and I said: “Those are original French Diderot Encyclopedias from the 1700s. Would you like to see them?”

And the mom just looked rather startled and pleased - “Can we? I mean, I’d hate to break it!”

These things are pretty big and heavy, and while you could ruin them in several ways, I took a random one off the shelf and let her view some pages while I explained what they were and why they’re so cool. (You can learn about that all here, if you’re curious about the Encyclopédie, ou dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers!)

The mom was way more excited than the daughter was, but still! It was fun to show it.

That’s such a cool story!

As it was explained to me, the oils from our hands help keep the documents supple. I got to leaf through a 12th Century Book of Hours that had me swooning.

(Source: )

Posted April 13th, 2011 with 206 notes .

How Might Historians Use the Wikileaks?

Posted December 2nd, 2010 with 1 note .

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